Special Education

To belong. It is important that we support each other, that we pray for each other, that we come together as people who have the same face. We need to love each other and then, as we learn to work together in a place of belonging and togetherness, we begin to see that it is important to listen to each other.

– Jean Vanier 

Students with Individual Education Plans should consider taking advantage of the following specialized Guidance and Career Education courses.

GLE1O Learning Strategies: Skills for Success in Secondary School
This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become more independent learners.  Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community.  The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Program Emphasis: The year one GLE course places an emphasis on understanding how and what can be done to improve one’s learning throughout secondary school. An important goal of GLE1O is to improve self-awareness and build the self-advocacy skills needed to foster independence.

GLE2O Learning Strategies: Skills for Success in Secondary School
This course focuses on learning strategies to help students become more independent learners.  Students will learn how to develop and apply literacy and numeracy skills, personal management skills, and interpersonal and teamwork skills to improve their learning and achievement in school, the workplace, and the community.  The course helps students build confidence and motivation to pursue opportunities for success in secondary school and beyond.

Program Emphasis: Year two continues to build on skills, strengths and independence goals.  A primary focus is continuing to develop critical thinking skills as these are required when students write the Ontario Secondary School Literacy Test (OSSLT).

GLE3O Advanced Learning Strategies: Skills for Success After Secondary School
This course improves students’ learning and personal management skills, preparing them to make successful transitions to work, training, and/or postsecondary education destinations.  Students will assess their learning abilities and use literacy, numeracy, and research skills and personal management techniques to maximize their learning.  Students will investigate trends and resources to support their postsecondary employment, training, and/or education choices and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals.

Program Emphasis: Year three GLE places an emphasis on evaluating, planning and choosing programs that will support possible pathways beyond secondary school. Self-advocacy continues to be developed with a focus on greater independences and future goals and education.  The future paths explored relate to workplace, apprenticeships, college and/or university placements.

GLE4O Advanced Learning Strategies: Skills for Success After Secondary School
This course improves students’ learning and personal management skills, preparing them to make successful transitions to work, training, and/or postsecondary education destinations.  Students will assess their learning abilities and use literacy, numeracy, and research skills and personal management techniques to maximize their learning.  Students will investigate trends and resources to support their postsecondary employment, training, and/or education choices and develop a plan to help them meet their learning and career goals.

Program Emphasis: Year four GLE places an emphasis on applying to and choosing a post-secondary placement. Students explore financial aid, bursaries and scholarships. Students directly connect with Learning Support Centres at post-secondary institutions. Each student prepares to better meet his/her specific areas of interest that will support possible pathways beyond secondary school. The path(s) related to any of the following may be explored: workplace, apprenticeship, college, and/or university.

Jean Vanier Special Education Resource Teachers:

  • Ms. A. Morrow – Special Education Department Head morrowa@hcdsb.org
  • Ms. T. Tapper – Special Education Resource Teacher (Life Skills)  tappert@hcdsb.org
  • Ms. Nieuwendyk- Special Education Resource Teacher (Life Skills) nieuwendykj@hcdsb.org
  • Ms. Daly – Special Education Resource Teacher (GLE) dalyl@hcdsb.org
  • Ms. Robertson- Special Education Resource Teacher (LTO) robertsonk@hcdsb.org
  • Ms. Maltby – Special Education Resource Teacher (GLE) maltbyt@hcdsb.org

Jean Vanier Educational Assistants:

  • Ms. Appleby
  • Ms. Brooks
  • Ms. Colonico
  • Ms. Price
  • Ms. H. Edwards
  • Ms. L. Edwards
  • Ms. Thissen
  • Ms. Socha
  • Ms. McMahon
  • Ms. Paveling (ASL Interpreter)
  • Ms. Olivierre
  • Ms. Morton
  • Ms. Nair
  • Ms. Sevigny
  • Mr. Zambrano
  • Ms. Pelliccotta

SEAC Soundbytes

https://www.hcdsb.org/Community/SEAC/Pages/default.aspx

September 2018-

SEAC SOUNDBYTES

Raising awareness of the Special Education process at HCDSB

September 2018

What is SEAC?

Welcome Back!

As we start a new school year, the members of SEAC wanted to take a minute to let you know who we are and what we do. Did you know that there is a committee in each school board or school authority that provides important and relevant advice on Special Education?

This committee is known as the Special Education Advisory Committee or SEAC. SEAC is made up of school board trustees and representatives of local associations with a common goal of protecting the interests and well-being of exceptional children or adults.

Associations currently represented on HCDSB SEAC are:

  • Association for Bright Children (ABC) Ontario, Halton Chapter; Autism Ontario; Easter Seals Ontario;
  • Halton Down Syndrome Association; VOICE for Hearing Impaired Children

The importance of SEAC is their ability to assist the board with understanding the special needs of exceptional children and youth, and to advise the board in matters that apply to the delivery of special education services and program.

Each school board and school authority in Ontario must establish a SEAC. The meetings are open to the public and everyone is encouraged to attend. HCDSB holds their SEAC meetings on the last Monday of each month at 7pm, at the Board office. We would love to see you there!

Please feel free to visit our website at www.hcdsb.org/Community/SEAC/Pages/default.aspx where you can also find more information on HCDSB SEAC including copies of minutes from previous meetings, and a listing of upcoming meetings.

Submitted by: Brenda Agnew, SEAC Chair, representing Easter Seals Ontario

October 2018-

SEAC SOUNDBYTES

Understanding Accommodations, Modifications and Alternative

                                    Programs in an IEP

                                                                                                                October 2018

The start of a new school year also means that soon classroom teachers will be working with their Special Education Resource Teachers (SERTs) to develop student Individual Education Plans (IEPs), which are usually ready for distribution to parents in the latter part of October.

Often times many of the terms used on the IEP can be confusing to parents. Terms such as Accommodations, Modifications and Alternative Programs as they relate to the Curriculum / Subjects Areas. What exactly does this mean and how does it affect the individual student?

Accommodations: When a subject is accommodated for a pupil nothing about the subject content changes. An easy way to explain this might be if you are reading a novel and you require reading glasses. Nothing about the content in your novel is changed but your reading glasses are considered an accommodation to be able to access the novel you wish to read. You require glasses as a support to see and absorb the material. Accommodations are categorized as instructional, environmental or assessment supports and are listed by category on the IEP. Accommodations that are routinely used by most teachers with the entire class are not listed. Accommodations include only those supports required by a student that differ from what is normally provided during classroom instruction. Some further examples include an alternative work space, duplicated notes, extra time, frequent breaks and reduction of tasks.

To reiterate nothing about the subject matter or level of instruction changes when a subject is accommodated only.

Modifications: When a subject is modified for a student there are aspects of the curriculum in that subject that DO change. In most cases the student may be presented with material below the grade level of their peers. In other subjects a modification can take the form of fewer learning expectations, simplified tasks or in some cases higher level activities. Because the material is being modified or changed from the regular curriculum for the student’s grade, it is necessary to record the pupil’s current level of functioning in that subject, an annual goal for the pupil, a sample selection of the learning expectations being presented, teaching strategies and assessment methods. A modified subject is one that has been changed to meet the level where the pupil can be expected to begin to progress.

Alternative: When a subject is alternative it is different curriculum from Ontario Curriculum. Samples of Alternative Curriculum include, Communication Numeracy, Communication Literacy, Daily Living and Employability Skills, Personal Care, Social Skills Training, Orientation and Mobility Training. Because this curriculum is different from regular grade curriculum, a current level of functioning, an annual goal, sample learning expectations, teaching strategies, and assessment strategies are outlined in detail in each subject area.

Some students may have IEPs with only alternative curriculum. Some pupils may only have accommodated subjects. Some students may have a combination of subjects that are modified, some that are accommodated only and some alternative subjects outlined in their IEP.

For more information, please visit https://www.hcdsb.org/Programs/SpecialEducation/SpecialEducationPlan/Pages/Individual-Education-Plans.aspx

Submitted by: Joanne Parisi, HCDSB SEAC Member at Large